Home

Rules and Handicap Evening 6th December

Don’t miss it! Rules and handicap changes information session

We’ve all got plenty to learn with major rules and handicapping system reforms on the horizon – starting in January.

Our competitions and handicap committees have set up an information evening in the clubhouse on Thursday 6 December at 7pm to help get members up to speed on one of the biggest ever shake-ups of golf governance.

The information evening will cover three key areas:

1. Rule changes which come into force on 1 January 2019

2. The results of a recent course assessment which will rank Chesterfield Golf Club in terms of difficulty in comparison with every other course in the new world system

3. How the new World Handicapping System will operate when introduced in 2020

Our own handicap guru Paul Bywater will be joined by competitions chairman Tim Roberts and Derbyshire County Golf’s Peter McGrath to deliver the session, which is expected to last around two hours.

Most imminent are the rule changes which come into force for the new year. Copies of the Players’ Edition of the Rules of Golf are available in the golf club foyer. Some of the headlines:

• Search time – reduced from 5 mins to 3 mins

• Ball moved during search – replace no penalty

• Embedded ball – free relief anywhere on course

• Dropping – from knee height

• Double hit – no penalty

• Touching ground in penalty area – no penalty

• All damage to green can be repaired

• Ball accidentally moved on putting green – replace without penalty

But these are just the highlights, there’s lots to get to grips with. The rules presentation will begin with a video explaining the major rule changes, followed by a question and answer session.

The new World Handicap System will bring huge changes. No longer will your handicap rise or fall determined solely by the score of your last qualifying round. Under WHS it will be determined using a complex formula which starts with an average of your best eight scores from your previous 20 rounds – factoring in course difficulty, conditions on the day, and a number of other factors.

Six existing handicapping authorities are linked in the system: Golf Australia, the Council of National Golf Unions (CONGU) in Great Britain and Ireland, the European Golf Association (EGA), the South African Golf Association (SAGA), the Argentine Golf Association (AAG) and the USGA.

So, in future, wherever you play in the world, your handicap will follow you across the globe, with adjustment dependant on the difficulty of the course.

It really is a whole new world, which is going to cause a bit of head-scratching. But, for now, come to an information session at little old Chesterfield Golf Club to get to grips with the basics!

Regards, Sean